Subordinate Supervisor Communications

Subordinate Supervisor Communications

Karen has been a supervisor of the nursing team at a local community clinic for nearly a year. Though her medical skills and experience are exemplary, she has struggled with her employee relations skills. Recently, her employees have started to slack in some of their admin-related duties and they have begun to show a lack of enthusiasm in daily tasks and special projects.

Unsure why this lack of engagement was occurring, Karen spoke with her manager and was informed that her employees have been increasingly frustrated with her micromanagement and demands for perfection, resulting in her team feeling that their work was not appreciated or valued. Karen was surprised by this and was shocked that no one had come to her to voice their concerns with her management style.

Karen’s manager realized that she should have spoken with Karen much sooner in an attempt to coach her on effective communication and managerial techniques to ensure less discord and more productivity within her team. There is so often a focus as managers to coach and correct the behaviors of our employees, but it is important to not overlook those subordinate managers who those employees interact with on a daily basis.

Mid-level managers are often the lifeline between employees and upper management (those who make the rules and set the expectations). These supervisors need to be regularly communicated with about the expectations of their jobs and provided with feedback regarding their performance as an individual and as a leader of their team. As a result of a lack of this, Karen’s team was disconnected and there was a general feeling of frustration amongst the staff members.

Take the time to meet with each manager individually to go over these expectations, to offer both positive and constructive feedback, and to allow for two-way communication. Provide them with the opportunity to convey to you their needs and goals for their team and work together to come up with a plan to help them achieve these objectives in ways that prove to be mutually beneficial to their personal development, to the team, and the organization as a whole.

Making this type of regular and effective communication with your managers a priority can snowball (in a good way!) and can lead to improved job satisfaction, fosters feelings of mutual respect and trust, can enhance positive work environments, and encourages team collaboration and camaraderie.

The Benefits of the Barbecue

The Benefits of the Barbecue

The dog days of summer provide employers with a great opportunity to show their employees some appreciation, why not with a good ole’ company picnic?! In today’s workforce climate, we are constantly reading articles and hearing horror stories warning us of what “not to do” when it comes to appropriately engaging with your employees. However, cultivating and maintaining strong relationships with and amongst your employees should still be a goal. Making certain that no lines are crossed, there are countless benefits to letting your employees know how much the are valued:

Higher Levels of Morale – Happy employees are simply more fun to work with. Picnics are known for boosting spirits and providing a much-needed break. The positive and uplifting pause in the daily grind is bound to put a smile on the face of even the most negative of employees.

Higher Levels of Productivity – High morale leads to higher levels of productivity. When an employee feels good about the organization they work for, they are in turn going to be more loyal and produce more quality work. Long term loyalty is invaluable and putting your employees first on these appreciation days is a no brainer when it comes to the pay off.

Builds Teamwork – Consider having team-themed games. What better way to work on working together than with classic races and games which require building trust and relying on one another?

Learning New Things – A chance for you to get to know your employees in a more casual and relaxed setting, take the time to mingle! With guards down, you may learn new things about your employees such as senses of humor, fun quirks, and hidden talents.

Take advantage of the warm summer months and throw a company picnic or barbecue! These get togethers seem to be a thing of the past, but think back to the last one you went to. Burgers and hotdogs on the grill, watermelon and cupcakes, and often with entertainment such as balloon animals, face painting, or a bouncy house for the kids. Happy memories, right?

Letting your employees know how much they are valued is a vital part of managing a business. These picnics or low key get togethers can really bring individuals and their families together, ensuring a safe and PG way for your employees to bond and build camaraderie, while feeling that their employer cares enough about them and their families to provide them with such an event.

2019 Labor Law Updates!

2019 Labor Law Updates!

A number of changes have hit the State of Oregon this past week, affecting a wide range of individuals. Oregon’s minimum wage increased this past Monday, and on Sunday, Oregon legislators passed a bill that will make the state the eighth in the nation to offer paid family and medical leave.

Oregon Minimum Wage Increase

July 1st marked the increase of Oregon’s minimum wage which increased by fifty cents to $11.25. Workers in the Portland-Metro area will see the minimum wage increase to $12.50, with the minimum wage in non-urban counties rising to $11 per hour. This is the fourth increase to the state’s minimum wage that Oregon has seen in the last four years.

The minimum wage increase was part of Senate Bill 1532, a three-tier minimum wage system that was passed in 2016 which locked in annual increases to the minimum wage through 2022, at which time the minimum wage will cap at $14.75 in the Portland-Metro area. After this time, any increases to the state’s minimum wage will be directly tied to inflation.

Paid Family and Medical Leave

On Sunday, June 30th, Senators in Oregon voted 21-6 to send House Bill 2005 to the governor, which proposes paid family and medical leave to workers who make more than $1,000 a year 12 weeks of paid leave for medical or family reasons. An incredibly generous program, this is the first paid leave program in the country which would offer 100% paid leave to low-income workers.

Employees and businesses will be required to contribute to this program, with small businesses being exempt from contributions. Workers will expect to see this benefit take effect in 2023.  

HRCentral will reach out to our clients individually if and when these updates affect their organization. Contact us today if you have any questions regarding either of these recent updates!

Rose Colored Glasses

Rose Colored Glasses

Everyone views the world through rose colored glasses. We all come from varied backgrounds and are equally unique. These differences should be celebrated and used to create a better understanding of the world we live in. Beyond the worthy goal of inclusion, these differences help all of us see things in a new way. Behold the power of perception!

When most of us see a cat we typically think, cute cuddly, funny, or simply not dangerous (well… maybe not all of us). However, from the mouse’s perspective, when he sees a cat, he sees and smells danger. Trust me, if you were the mouse’s size you would too.

In our last post, we discussed the concept of Active Listening and its importance in our daily lives. A large part of being an active listener is translating the message into a language that you understand. That translation process inevitably includes our personal perceptions.

Whenever we encounter new information, we try and make sense of the information using our experiences. Because of this application of our experiences in interpreting our world, we can run into the dangerous trap of our perceptions leading us down the path of misunderstanding and confusion.

A common example of perceptions is driving. Most drivers tend to get slightly upset (okay, angry) at other drivers. They won’t get out of the middle lane, they cut us off, they don’t use their blinker, they drive too fast, they drive too slow, etc. This anger often causes us to feel that the other drivers are out to get us, that their behaviors and actions are a personal attack of some kind. The reality is that more often than not, the other driver simply made a mistake and was in no way out to get you.

These concepts are not new to us, but those of us who aspire to be better communicators have to start cleaning our own house (i.e., yourself). Take inventory about how you are perceiving the world. Do you feel that you’re not getting enough information? Is the world out to get you? Does everything you touch turn to gold?

In order to better understand those we interact with, we must first understand how we translate the world. Once you understand, then you can push past those dangerous perceptions and try and see the world from others viewpoints and other perspectives.

UPDATE!: EEO-1 Pay Data Reporting

UPDATE!: EEO-1 Pay Data Reporting

Last month, we informed our clients and colleagues of the recent, pending decision of whether or not qualifying employers would be required to submit Component 2 (collection of pay data) of the EEO-1 report by May 31, 2019 in addition to Component 1. “Component 2” of the EEO-1 report is intended to analyze pay data to determine any disparities or discrimination in pay, with the goal of improving upon this issue should any discrepancies come to light.  

Last week, the EEOC finally released an update on the requirement to submit pay data. Employers who meet the EEOC’s reporting criteria are required to submit Component 2 of the EEO-1 report for both 2018 and 2017 no later than September 30, 2019.

Note: Employers are still expected to submit Component 1 of the EEO-report by the May 31, 2019 deadline.

The EEOC will begin accepting this component of the report in mid-July from employers who file the EEO-1 report annually who have more than 100 employees (in both the private sector and some federal/government contractors or subcontractors with more than 50 employees). Employers are expected to report pay data which includes hours actually worked and pay data gathered from their employee’s W-2 forms which will be categorized by race, ethnicity, and sex.

2019 EEO-1 Reporting Deadlines:

  • May 31, 2019:  Component 1 data for 2018 is due
  • June 14, 2019: Component 1 data for employers that requested a two-week extension is due
  • July 15, 2019: Expected date employers can begin submitting Component 2 of the EEO-1 report
  • September 30, 2019: Component 2 data for 2017 and 2018 is due

Don’t wait until the last minute to get this data compiled; HRCentral is here to help you and your HR Department gather and submit data for your organization’s EEO-1 report. Contact us today for assistance in filing or for establishing a streamlined reporting process.

Celebrating All Things Mom!

Celebrating All Things Mom!

This Sunday marks Mother’s Day, the one day out of the year in which we celebrate all things mom! While this of course shouldn’t be the ONLY day we show some appreciation and love to the mothers in our lives, many of us jump on this opportunity to express the gratitude and admiration to the women who do so much for us. In the workplace, celebrating strong and dedicated women is something many employers like to do; however, there are a few things to keep in mind when organizing and executing a workplace, Mother’s Day celebration.

While Mother’s Day is full of joy and love for so many of us, it is important to keep in mind that for others, this day can be challenging and very emotional. Some may be missing a mother who has passed away, some women wish to be mothers but for whatever reason are not, some mothers may be mourning the loss of a child. Be mindful and respectful of those mothers and employees who may be struggling this Mother’s Day, and try to coordinate activities that will ideally not make anyone feel left out. Consider a few of these options for celebrating the moms within your company:

  • Have a Mother’s Day potluck – ideally one in which moms don’t have to do any work!
  • Order food in and have a luncheon or breakfast catered
  • Give each mother a small gift (e.g., a coffee card, chocolates, a rose, etc.), but make sure that gift giving isn’t extravagant to the point that some women are made to feel left out
  • Consider flexibility with scheduling if a mother wants to celebrate with their family (e.g., many schools invite mothers for “tea parties” or other activities)
  • Acknowledge women who may be struggling this Mother’s Day; let them know they are not invisible and offer a small gift or note to attempt to make a hard day manageable

Being a mother in any capacity is hard work, and with nearly 60 million working moms in today’s workforce, employers have a responsibility to try to create a culture that supports working mothers (and parents in general). At the end of the day, let your employees (particularly on this day, working mothers) know that their hard work is valued and appreciated year-round, in addition to celebrating the hard work moms do on this special day.